Sorry, this is in fact the video of the full interview.  Earlier post is the short video on the 9 Principles.

Interview with Bill Moyers on The Leaderless Revolution.  To be broadcast in the US over this weekend, and in New York City on April 8th.

The Leaderless Revolution: A new Paradigm of Political Change

This article was posted in Huffington Post today, headed by this video (which can also be viewed here):

A new paradigm of political change:


The political methods of the 20th century are, it appears, less and less effective for the world of the 21st.

The nature of globalization is without precedent: accelerating interconnectedness, with billions of people interacting constantly in a massive, dynamic, and barely comprehensible process.

Yet the assumption persists that the political processes and institutions designed in the 20th century, or earlier, remain appropriate and effective in this profoundly different state of affairs. In fact it appears that the ability of national governments and international authorities to manage the severe problems arising from this new dispensation are declining, despite their claims to the contrary.

Take climate change. The annual climate summit has just ended in Durban, after dozens of “preparatory” meetings and thousands of diplomatic discussions. Its output was a decision to agree a treaty in 2015 to introduce emissions limits in 2020. Oddly, many governments (and commentators) are claiming this as some kind of victory.

It is traditional to blame individual states (the US, China) for the failure to agree to more robust measures, and these do bear some responsibility. It is however also apparent that the process itself is the problem, and has been since its inception. The negotiation echoes traditional models of state-based interaction. Governments treat it as a bargaining process, where commitments to curb emissions have to be matched by other countries. The net result is that nothing is done.

The correct measure of Durban is not the declarations of success by the participating governments, which are required to trumpet their own effectiveness and negotiating prowess. The only output that matters is the concentration of carbon in the atmosphere. This has grown with unprecedented rapidity by more than 10% since the first such conference, the so-called “Earth Summit” in Rio de Janeiro in 1992.

Effects in the real world should be the test of such processes, and indeed of all political methods, including government’s. By this measure, efforts to curb financial volatility or terrorism have been similarly ineffective. Experts say that the internationally-agreed Basel III rules to reduce risky banking practice are insufficient, and they are already being watered down by banks’ lobbying. Ten years after 9/11, and despite the killing of Osama bin Laden, we find ourselves in a condition of never-ending threat, multiple conflicts and the seemingly permanent embrace of an intrusive and hugely expensive security state.

There is a more pernicious consequence of the repetitive but tenuous claims to effectiveness made by the practitioners of conventional politics and government: everyone else is dulled into stupefied inaction. If “the authorities” claim to be on top of these problems, what does it matter what we do? And here’s the rub. We have been pummeled into a kind of dazed apathy, endlessly badgered by politicians that they can fix it, when in fact we are the most potent agents of change.

At home, democracy has been subverted. Corporations donate copiously to both parties to insure their influence. Politicians initiate legislation in order to extract rents from big business. Private prison owners lobby for longer sentences. There are now lobbying organizations representing the interests of lobbyists.

This legal corruption is deeply entrenched in our supposedly democratic political system, resisting all attempts at reform. It is naïve to expect decisions from this system to reflect the interests of ordinary people. And this is what we see: tax regimes that tax incomes of the poor more than the accumulating wealth of the rich; healthcare legislation whose primary beneficiary is the healthcare industry; a comprehensive failure to regulate the banking industry to prevent further violent crises such as the ‘08 credit crunch.

Cynical despair would be a perfectly understandable response to this dismal picture. But this reaction entirely suits those who profit from the status quo. Instead, this analysis leads to one clear prerogative: there is no choice but to act ourselves. If we are not to stand by while the world’s problems deepen, there is only one alternative: action based upon on our convictions, uniting with others for greatest effect. And as we shall see in the next post, such action is in fact far more powerful than any other method of politics in effecting real and lasting change.

A former diplomat, Carne Ross is the author of The Leaderless Revolution: how ordinary people will take power and change politics in the 21st century, published by Blue Rider Press (Penguin), ebook now available, hardcover to be published in January 2012. For further information and videos explaining the book, visit www.theleaderlessrevolution.com. This is the first in a series of four posts.

#OWS - Alternative Banking proposal - The Commons: A good bank

This note was shared with members of the Alternative Banking working group of Occupy Wall Street (New York) today.  It reflects our discussions in recent weeks.

The Commons: A Good Bank

 

112411 draft

 

 

This note has been prepared by the alternative banking working group of the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) movement.  The note is for discussion with the OWS movement and more broadly. 

 

The purpose of this note is to describe the characteristics of an ideal bank that embodies the values of the OWS movement.  The current banking system lies at the heart of our current economic crisis of increasing volatility and inequality.  To change that system, we need to replace it with a better bank.  What would be the characteristics of this bank?

 

None of these features is new, and many are already evident in credit unions, community banks and “mutuals”.  But our purpose is to imagine something that might have a broader reach and impact – that might transform the banking system, and thus, by its example and through its operations, potentially create an economy that is fairer, more inclusive, democratically managed and stable.

 

1.     Democratic – all customers would own the bank, and have an equal say in its governance, regardless of the amount of money in their accounts.  Employees – or rather partners - might be co-owners of the bank, forming a co-operative.

2.     Accessible – the bank’s services would be accessible to all, and in particular the poor, who are often excluded from today’s banking system, thus making them vulnerable, for instance, to predatory lending.  Ideally, the bank would be available to anyone in the country, and perhaps one day, the world.

3.     Stable – the bank would eschew the risky practices of the for-profit banks that have damaged the world economy (affecting particularly the poor) and perpetuate systemic risk.  Instead, it would operate in a way to minimize risk, for instance by mutualising all its liabilities in a manner suggested in Laurence Kotlikoff’s concept of “Limited Purpose Banking”.

4.     Non-profit – the bank would be run for the benefit of its customers and employees.  Any profit would be returned to customers in the form of cheaper loans or other services, or pro bono services – such as interest-free loans - for those in dire need.  Without the need to generate profits or maintain a high stock price, the bank could offer more competitive services than the for-profit banks, thereby contributing to the next characteristic.

5.     Competitive – the bank would offer services to individuals and businesses that would be as good as or better than those offered by for-profit banks.  This objective is plausible if the bank is non-profit, and has a “light” infrastructure, perhaps by essentially operating as a “clearing house” to match lenders and borrowers (similar but not identical to “peer-to-peer” services).  We also note the abysmal quality of current banking services in the US, in contrast for example to those offered in many European countries.

6.     Transparent – the opacity and unintelligibility (even to those working in finance) of the financial system have contributed to the “credit crunch” collapse.  The operations of this bank would by contrast be wholly transparent, thus again helping minimize any risk caused by its operations.

7.     Equal – no partner or employee in the bank would be paid more than a certain multiple of the lowest-paid worker, for instance no more than eight or five times that number.  In this way, the bank would promote greater equality and would encourage this characteristic in the economy more widely.  This would also contribute to the competitiveness of the bank.

 

In establishing the bank, the principles embodied in the characteristics outlined above should be followed as much as possible (“the means are the ends”).  One possibility to consider too is that, like the Grameen Bank, the bank might operate upon trust rather than legal contract with its customers, thus helping rebuild this scarce social commodity.

 

If there is general consensus within OWS and perhaps more broadly on the desirability of such a bank, the Alternative Banking group will set itself to the design and perhaps construction of the bank, drawing on the examples and experience – and perhaps the assistance – of similar such banks around the world.  But there is no monopoly here: anyone is free to take inspiration from these ideas and embark upon the same challenge.

 

 

 

 

New York City

November 24, 2011

 

 

John Burnside. The surprise hit of 2011, in our house at least, was The Leaderless Revolution (Simon and Schuster, £16.99), an inspiring plea for emergent anarchism from former British WMD and sanctions expert Carne Ross. If everyone read this book, politics might begin to be about trusting each other rather than lobbies, subsidies and cynicism

The Browser on The influences behind The Leaderless Revolution

Our political and economic systems are inadequate and failing. But what can we do? The author of a new book on the subject tells us what inspired his involvement in the Occupy movement and how a leaderless revolution could work